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  1. l decided to upgrade my HeadPlay HD goggles with some new features. Specifically I wanted to add diversity receivers and a DVR. In case other HeadPlay owners wanted to duplicate my DiY project I purposely selected components that are readily available. But be warned: The task requires electronic skills and a 3D printer, so it's not a project for everyone. Total cost of parts is about $80 USD. Here's some photos of the finished project. A 3D printed enclosure contains the 5.8GHz diversity vRx and low cost SD card type DVR. A toggle switch (bottom left side of photo) is used to select live video or DVR playback video. The original 5.8GHz vRx board is removed (but the LCD driver board remains). A 3D printed filler panel replaces the vRx board and is used to cover-up the vacant vRx's holes. The 3D printed parts help with the aesthetics. It's a bit boxy looking, but the simple 3D printed shapes ensure successful printing on nearly any printer. I used ABS filament but PLA will work too. And the best part is that you can remove the mods and restore the goggles back to their original configuration. The only evidence of it would be five small holes from the mounting screws. Nice!
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