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Jevis

Can I use a flash PIC?

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I'm planning on building a simple modelplane out of two pieces of plexiglass for demonstrating the primairy workings of an aircraft and the stickmovement vs controlsurfaces to the audience of several local RC exhibitions. Using the sticks of an cheap TX I'm trying to directly control the servo's. In search for the needed electronic logic I came across several descriptions for R/C servo testers.

After reading the article on this site I ended up in the FAQ section. There I got a glimps of the things that could go wrong when programming an PIC.

In the article it self they mention:

The PIC12C50x is not a "Flash" part, so you will need a traditional PIC chip programmer to "burn" the hex file's object code into the microcontroller.

I now get the feeling that using Flashable PICs in the first place might turn out the be the cheapest. And also: I have to do four of them.

So to refraise that: Can I swap the PIC12C509 for PIC12F509 models without negative consequences?

Second question: What do the suffixes in the typename like -I/P and -I/SN mean and which should I choose?

Last question: There seem to be different types of housings like DIP, CERDIP, SOIC, SO, etc. Do I have to take that in consideration as well?

Thanks a lot for any helpfull replies!

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I'm an AVR guy, so I don't know too much about the differences between the C and F models, other than the FLASH mem difference, but I would assume that they are identical parts otherwise.

Maybe RC-CAM can help out on this one.

On the package it comes in DIP vs SOIC, etc, just get one that you are comfortable working with. I prefer DIP for prototyping, then SOIC or QFP for final production. I try to stay away from no-lead packages, they're just a pain to solder with the air gun.

Edited by eickst

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I now get the feeling that using Flashable PICs in the first place might turn out the be the cheapest.

The Flash parts are ideal for hobbyists that are developing PIC projects. As they write and test their code, they can re-use the same part over and over again. But when building a finished project (like RCST), the flash feature is not of much importance (unless you plan on using the PIC later on in another project).

Keep in mind that using a Flash part does not prevent problems. I have seen a lot of folks accidentally erase/overwrite the factory osc calibration data stored in them, which renders them unworthy for projects like the RCST.

Can I swap the PIC12C509 for PIC12F509 models without negative consequences?

The object code is compatible. However, that does not mean the project will work exactly the same. You won't know until you try it.

What do the suffixes in the typename like -I/P and -I/SN mean and which should I choose?

That specifies operating temperature and package type. The PIC data sheet describes it in full detail. For hobby projects, any temperature range is fine and the package you use depends on how you want to install it (DIP or surface mount).

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Thanks for the help so far.

I'll bear in mind your warnings about screwing up the factory osc calibration data, when I program my first PIC ;).

Concerning the housing: I'm sorry, reading the tech notes for the second time I saw the different housings explained in full detail. RTFM is in place I think :D.

Tommorow I'll check the local radio shop for the necessary parts.

I'll keep the readers of this topic posted about my progress.

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