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popunonkok

Composit signal from digital camera

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Hi.

This is my first post here, I'm new to the wireless cam thing but have flown rc planes and helicopters for quite some time now...

Now, on to the question.

I want to send the video output from my digital camera (Olympus Stylus Verve) using the transmitter from a "2.4ghz spy cameras". Please tell me that this is possible... :unsure:

The digital camera has a composit output that I can plug in to the TV.

When I open the "Spycam" it looks verry much like the Hong kong camera that is in the special projects on this site.

cam_rf2a.jpg

Exept my has two white cables between the cam and the TX but I think that is because my has sound aswell. What do you think? Is it the sound?

So, could I just connect my cameras (yellow) video cable to the small TX's (yellow) video cable? Or is there signal streangth problem and stuff like that?

I think thats it, all my questions...

Here is a summary of my questions. :D

1: Is the second white cable between the cam and the TX for the sound?

2: If it is, is there a way to determine wich one that is for the sound and wich one is 8v?

3: Will there be any problem if I connect my digital cameras composit output to the video cable on the TX? (Like signal strength)

I'm hoping for some possitive answers... :)

// Peter Finnberg

Uppsala

Sweden

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Of the various CMOS (wired and wireless) cameras I've taken apart it generally is the rule that black=ground, red=positive (ie 5v or 8v), white=audio and yellow=video but never trust it, always check.

You need a multimeter to determine what the ground and 8v lines are going to the transmitter, once you've figured that out then hooking up the video & audio is easy, if the video & audio wires are the same colour then try connecting them one way round and if that doesn't work then swap the wires.

Accidentally mixing up the audio & video lines won't do any damage because they're only 1v peak-to-peak, but you sure don't want to accidentally plug 8v back into your video source.

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