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JMS

WHAT ARE THE CAMERA SPECS TO LOOK FOR?

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Ok so I've purchased a few cameras in my past and they look great indoors but out doors they look terrible, espcially when in the air. I know LUX is the amount of light going into the camera, like .005LUX which mean pretty good in the dark envoirment. Then auto iris, which mean the cameras' iris will close or open when too much light or not enough light enter the lens. Vari-focal which mean you can adjust the focus whether you want a wide angle view or close up view. 5 volt or 12 volt power consumption which I know the lower the power intake the better, but what about the other specifications when shopping for a camera?

My last purchase was a KT&C bullet cam which is a all around good Korean made camera. The other is a 520tvl Chinese made EX-VIEW board camera, which turned out terrible. I NOW know that typically Chinese made cameras tend to have a "warm" colour, but dark image. So I will avoid the Chinese made stuff now! Trial and error!

I would like to make my next purchase with no waste and would like to know how to read the specifications in what is a good board camera for FPV. Can anyone help me out with this?

I made a little video last week to show you how terrible the video quality is with my Chinese made Sony EX-VIEW board camera. Mind you the SD camcorder has a lot to do with the poor video quality as well, since tested the same camera on a DVD writer and there was some improvements (just trying what I have on hand). Also sharing the plane battery with camera was not too good (for me) either since the camera may be power hungry? Anyhow here is the video for everyone to analyse & disect!!!!

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=U83EBYQA

Thanks everyone in advance!!! ;)

Edited by JMS

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Hi JMS,

actually iam facing the same problem... Which camera to buy? There is a quite informative thread about cameras:

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=631723

but still leaves to me a lot of open questions...

Anyway, i remember Sergio00 run a 480TVL camera on his videos. The camera did perform actually pretty well. So i would definitly go for that camera :-) Hej, Sergio can you post the link to your 480TVL camera? Is it this one?:

http://store.pcsurveillance.net/KPC_S700CH...kpc-s700chb.htm

regards,

Sibi

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Yeah I have been staring at that thread too! The info I seek should apply whether it's a 380 or a 600tvl camera, so I figure this would be valuable for all of us if we knew how to determine (by camera specs) which is the right one to purchase. :D

Oh yeah Sergio00's camera is great but if I recall, the site he purchased from is in Spain. " ¡Yo no hablo español! " Believe me that took great effort for me to make that translation! :lol:

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but what about the other specifications when shopping for a camera?

The key to good performance is related to dynamic range and s/n, as well as its AGC, auto balance, and BLC behavior. These things are especially important in our outdoor application. The problem is, what is the minimum spec? For sure, the pixel count and lux are less important, at least to me.

To make things more difficult in choosing, much of the magic is in the firmware (or hardware) that controls the image processing. The problem is, there is no way to know if they got it right until after you have made the purchase. Even if the new camera choice uses a chip set that is in your favorite camera.

I like the idea of creating a spec standard, but even having those won't always ensure a good choice. It might be better to create a list of CCD board cameras that work well.

It is very rare to find a new winner. That is why some of us tend to stick with those CCD cameras that have proven to work for us.

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It is very rare to find a new winner. That is why some of us tend to stick with those CCD cameras that have proven to work for us.

Too true...

I still haven't found something that would beat the KX131 in all categories, and I've been looking around for like 1 year and a half now. I might just have received something close to what I was wishing for, but not quite, the cam being 12V and not 5. Oh well, at least the image characteristics and size seem to be met, just have to confirm that as I've only done outdoor tests along with a TR/RX set, and I've had weird green lines on the red subject. Need to find where that comes from now...

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The key to good performance is related to dynamic range and s/n, as well as its AGC, auto balance, and BLC behavior. These things are especially important in our outdoor application. The problem is, what is the minimum spec? For sure, the pixel count and lux are less important, at least to me.

To make things more difficult in choosing, much of the magic is in the firmware (or hardware) that controls the image processing. The problem is, there is no way to know if they got it right until after you have made the purchase. Even if the new camera choice uses a chip set that is in your favorite camera.

I like the idea of creating a spec standard, but even having those won't always ensure a good choice. It might be better to create a list of CCD board cameras that work well.

It is very rare to find a new winner. That is why some of us tend to stick with those CCD cameras that have proven to work for us.

Yes I guess you are right about lux rating and pixel count in terms of little importance. I agree with you on how a good camera manages the back light compensation, auto balance etc.. But I'm not sure of what AGC is. Also does s/n stands for signal noise?

Anyhow I guess there is no real bullet proof way to determine which is the right camera except to buy and try :( . I know that we better avoid the Chinese made stuff since their quality is still not there yet.

So is it useful to obtain the KX131 spec so we have something to compare to?

I really don't have to stick with Sony chipset personally, it just seem to be easily available everywhere. I've used many, many, many of them for personal surveillance for my businesses and they have proven well for me compared to the other brands I've used. ( except Panasonic... never tried them yet.)

I appreciate the productive response from you all! Thanks!!!! :)

JMS

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