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I have constructed my own R/C vehicle. The power supply to this vehicle puts out 22.3 V which I’m hoping I can use too power everything, however I need to be able too turn the camera that I am using for video feed on and off or my battery life wont meet my requirements. What I would like too do is use the landing gear switch to turn my camera on and off. I have all the converts that I need to get the required voltages, but the on / off part is still uncertain to me. I’m thinking of connecting the channel that drives the landing gear from the receiver too the gate of a PMOS transistor, which I am hoping I can use too turn the power supply too the camera on and off. I’m not sure how well this works because I don’t know how the signal from the receiver to what would be the servo looks like, in other words… Will it give me enough juice to run the camera for a second then stop.. or will it allow a continuous supply of current too flow to power the camera until I cut it off. Any help would be nice. Sorry if my train of thought jumps around a lot, and question is hard too follow, my brain isn’t working so well today.

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You will not be able to just connect a transistor directly to the Rx. The PWM signal is not compatible at that level. You need to decode the servo pulse first.

There are commercially available R/C switches that will do this. If you can burn a PIC microcontroller, then the RC-CAM PanCam project has an on/off control feature that will do the job. Details are on the web site.

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The problem with the ones that I have found so far is that they draw too much current too operate. I need something that uses a lower current. The lower current the better, and the AQV212 seems too draw a lot more current then I can affored too let it suck down.. :(

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With resistor value shown in the project's schematic, the AQV212 draws 14mA when it is on, 0mA when it is off. The PIC consumes less than 3mA.

If the AQV's "On" current is too much then just use a transistor.

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