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Hi all. I just started getting into this. I just got a 900mhz system. I am in the market to buy some video goggles. Can anyone tell me what they use and pro and cons to watch out for? Also, can anyone tell me if the Focus-X and the RV-545 the same glasses? I like the Focus-X so far. Thanks for any info....

David

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Hi Duncan. Good luck with this - FPV tends to be a 'work in progress', rather than a project where you get stuff off the shelf and it all works just as you want it to first time. I've used Sony Glasstron goggles (superbly engineered, but low-res), and recently upgraded to Rvision (the pricier cousin of the RV-545) - a total bargain, weighing 62g.

re. Goggles:

Brightness - Lots! Although I've not come across a useful spec to compare models...

Resolution - important. I've found going up to 640x480 has greatly increased what I can see, in the real world (standing in the middle of a sunlit field, trying to see what the camera is transmitting).

Light-tightness - it's worth putting effort into excluding extraneous light, as the less of this there is the better; if you're not a glasses wearer the rubber cups can work well, if you do wear glasses it's not insoluble. You can use a modified baseball cap, or cut some blackout material to fit the goggles to your head (works well for me), or just put your head in a black cloth bag!

Goggle settings - some goggles (Rvision, RV-545) have no settings, some do (contrast etc.), and some people have encountered problems that can be addressed by adjusting the goggle's settings. (I've not come across anything that can't be sorted out by optimising the video downlink.)

Weight - Some goggles use halo-type straps which distribute the weight around the head, less of a problem. However, if they are resting on your nose, always go for lighter rather than heavier, as they always try & fall off...

Cable security - This summer, the plug into the goggles pulled out after launch, and I lost a 'plane. Ouch. Such is life when you're FPV slope-soaring over 500ft cliffs. If any connector's not fixed in, make sure it is strapped tight (velcro etc.).

I hope these comments are helpful. There's loads of stuff about goggles on this board, read them all!

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Light-tightness - it's worth putting effort into excluding extraneous light, as the less of this there is the better; if you're not a glasses wearer the rubber cups can work well, if you do wear glasses it's not insoluble. You can use a modified baseball cap, or cut some blackout material to fit the goggles to your head (works well for me), or just put your head in a black cloth bag!

While a good point, putting a black cloth bag over your head might seem like you've just been kidnapped hehehehe... kidnapped by the hobby :D

On a serious note though, you want them to be as a adjustable as possible :)

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RC-groups has a brief discussion on the topic, and apparantly they like the HeadPlay goggles. To me these seem a bit expensive considering the fact that you have to buy an additional $79 battery for autonmous use, which brings the total up to >$600.

HeadPlay Goggles are the Best!

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=746222

Going forward, has anybody tried the Vuzix AV920 yet? And how do these more expensive goggles compare to those offered by Rangevideo et al, I'm referring to the Rvision goggles that are sold by them and are also commonly found on eBay. Anybody did a direct comparison to the HeadPlay goggles?

Cheers,

Sander.

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Basically, the RVision I-Vision, Focus, etc. etc. are mostly all the same. They all utilize the Kopin modules (two of them) and are made in China. The optics have varying quality, kinda depends on your luck, but when they work, they're pretty good. Construction quality is so-so, and some of the wires may actually get worn out through wear and tear. Picture quality is not too bad, slight pin-cushioning.

The Headplay is a much better constructed unit, bulkier, less portable, and more expensive. It uses one SVGA module, also made in China. Picture size is just a bit bigger than for the Kopin modules (also depends if customized optics are used a-la Fatshark), and is more fully featured. I think that for the price, you do get your money's worth in features, and picture quality.

As for value/money, the Headplay probably leads the others, depending on how much you get them for (prices vary from $240-$300+ for the others).

To break it down for you, there are 3 types of modules being used on the market, primarily:-

Kopin - RVision, Focus, IVision, Fatshark, Oriscape, etc. etc.

Syntax - Headplay

eMagin - Z800, Oculon, etc.

Daniel

Edited by Daniel Wee

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Thanks Daniel,

The problem with most of this Chinese stuff is that they make a habit out of copying one another, hence it is really hard to seperate the good ones from the bad ones, as they all look alike. On eBay for example, there's plenty of goggles to be found that look exactly like Rvision that is sold by Rangevideo, but are they the same thing?

Cheers,

Sander.

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Range Video sell the Rvision and it's cheaper, heavier cousin the R545. I've found Vova Reznik at Range Video very helpful...

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Thanks Doofer,

I might just buy the HeadPlay goggles and set my mind at ease, apparantly those are the best goggles available.

Cheers,

Sander.

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