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Help: Can you ID this IR Sensor?


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I would like to find the source to the IR sensor used in the FMA Co-Pilot. The part is marked DST60 001. It is in a TO-5 package and is three leads (one is mtg leg). The traditional "base" lead is cut off. See photo below.

I have searched EEM, IC Master, Google, and everwhere else. The DST marking is just not coming up. Given that FMA is a small volume mfg, I doubt they have house-marked the part. But, anything is possible.

So, does anyone out there know who makes this component? If not, how about a CHEAP (<$3 each) compatible sub?

post-6-1079983009_thumb.jpg

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IR sensor used in the FMA Co-Pilot.

I've tried using Melexis sensors in Co-Pilot-like set-up.

http://www.melexis.com/prodfiles/mlx90247.pdf

They are very close in their appearence, electrical characterstics and response time. If I could, I'd bet that this is where FMA gets their sensors from. Unfortunately they are more than $3 a piece.

Regards,

Val.

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Everyone, thanks for the links.

Cyberflyer, the Melexis DSE or ESF sensor looks like a good candidate. Which one did you try? Did you ever pop one into the Co-Pilot's IR board to see if it worked with their microcontroller module?

BTW, what sort of markings are on your part?

The Melexis part, in 10K pc lots, is probably very low cost; perhaps under $3. But, I'm guessing it sells for about $15 each in small quantities (am I close?). For my pet project, I need to find a sub that cost much less in single qty. I'll have to browse through my surplus supply catalogs to see what comes up.

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I used DSE sensor. The markings on the part says:

MLX90247B

The single unit is $16.50 from Digikey. You are probably right - 10k lot can be bought for $30K - but I am not yet at this level of production cycle :) .

BTW, what kind of project you are contemplating?

Please, let me know if you find chearper substitute.

Regards.

Val.

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BTW, what kind of project you are contemplating?

DIY poor man's Co-pilot clone for camera stabilization.

Thanks for the info. If I find a cheap sub I will let you know. It does not sound hopeful though.

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Mr.RC-Cam

I most definately wish you speed and success with your camera stabilization efforts using thermopile sensors. I'm very very interested.

About 5 months ago I was in contact with Brian Taylor who has built several horizon detecting thermopile sensors just like the FMA co-pilot. ( One of his papers of great interest to this is HSAS: VMC Autopilot. He also uses the Melexis sensors and has been unable to find better/cheaper sensors. Unfortunately, he could do no better in price than the $15-16/piece.

(As an aside, he also presents the idea that the FMA Copilot is not original nor patentable since it had been in use by NASA and in public domain for many years prior.)

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(As an aside, he also presents the idea that the FMA Copilot is not original nor patentable since it had been in use by NASA and in public domain for many years prior.)

I came to that conclusion too. In my search for thermopiles I found descriptions of them in horizon sensing applications that are dated older than the Co-Pilot's patent claims. But, as a R/C model stabilization device that exploits thermal sensing, it is a first. So on that basis there is a patent opportunity.

I have not really read the FMA patent claims (I have just reviewed the technical description) so I cannot really comment on what they submitted as the patentable aspects of the design.

Heck, Jeff Bezos patented "One-Click" internet purchasing for his Amazon web site long after most of us had one-clicked nearly everything on the net. The patent office is really out of control and they even admit that many patents are probably not enforceable. But those patent bragging rights look great in the corp's marketing brochures.

Thanks for the link to the VMC Autopilot whitepaper. I'll check it out.

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