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Terry

5.8Ghz interference?

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I had to abandon all my 2.4Ghz video gear due to wifi and the new 2.4Ghz RC systems. Now I see that DJI are using 5.8Ghz for RC control. Has anyone seen any interference from these? Are they even legal for RC control in the UK?

Terry

Edited by Terry

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If the UK observes the CE regulations then it would be legal in your country. DJI's says it is CE approved but I couldn't find any test information. But the FCC test docs are available from the fcc.gov site (registration ID SS3-WM300U58G). So it is definitely legal (license free) in the USA.

According to the wiki: On the back of the 5.8GHz controller is a access hole that allows switching between CE and FCC operation. Seems odd that they would allow the user to change the regulatory setting because it could cause non-conformance in some countries.

http://wiki.dji.com/en/images/6/6d/P2v-Compliance_Version_Configuration.png

Regarding interference with your 5.8GHz FPV, don't setup your ground station next to a 5.8GHz Phantom operator. :)

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This may help from the OfCom website in the UK OfW311 Radio Contolled models:

IR 2030 (available here) sets out the criteria that must be met by certain short range devices, in order to qualify for exemption from the need for a licence. It provides for devices that operate on 5.8 GHz (IR2030/1/23 on page 21) and permits airborne use though radiated power must not exceed 25 mW EIRP. We believe that this could cover video cameras.

and this for the 2.4Ghz band

Additionally, the Wideband Data Transmission Applications (WBDTS) at 2.4 GHz may also be used for model control. Apparatus is allowed to operate at higher powers than the General Non-Specific Short Range Devices.

Peter

I have a vague recollection that power on 2.4G is 100mW EIRP

Edited by pseddon

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Thanks peter. For video we can use 10mW at 2.4Ghz and 25mW at 5.8Ghz but I have seen no info on 5.8Ghz use for RC control.

Terry

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The 5.8GHz DJI controller is stated to have CE approval. I have not found any official test docs that confirms this is a valid claim, but it would be risky for DJI to misrepresent the approvals on their Tx.

UK's 5.8GHz exemption for radio control models:

IR 2030 (available here) sets out the criteria that must be met by certain short range devices, in order to qualify for exemption from the need for a licence. It provides for devices that operate on 5.8 GHz (IR2030/1/23 on page 21) and permits airborne use though radiated power must not exceed 25 mW EIRP.

The above text was taken from official ofcam docs published here:

http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/spectrum/information/licence-exempt-radio-use/licence-exempt-devices/ofw311

See page 23 for 5.8GHz:

http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/spectrum/spectrum-policy-area/spectrum-management/research-guidelines-tech-info/interface-requirements/IR_2030-june2014.pdf.

I heard that there was a ban on 5.8GHz sUAS control by UK's CAA rules, but it may have been lifted. So for those that are required to operate in accordance with the CAA permissions, be sure to check with them to confirm their latest rules / recommendations.

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It seems they are just using the general band that is free to use at 25mW but not specifically for model control. I wonder how good the band is for this if the switch is left in the 25mW position? Can they be shot down by 5.8Ghz video? or even 5.8ghz wifi that is creeping in at much higher power levels?

Im not sure I would want to risk it!

Terry

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