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I'm sure this question has come up a million times, but please indulge me if you will.

As a newbie, I was totally unaware that a ham license is required to operate the now ubiquitous plethora of CCTV gadgets operating on the 1.2 and 2.4 Ghz frequencies.

Can someone offer a summary of the license requirements, such as what level license is needed, exam required, power restrictions, etc.

I have followed some of the links to try to get these answers, but deciphering the FCC rules.....well, they are not exactly simple to follow.

Very few of the security equipment sites make any mention of licensing. I did find one that mentioned it in the microprint at the bottom of the page. These devices are now so ubiquitous that I'm guessing that very few users are actually licensed.

Thanks, in advance for your help!

Tom

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Can someone offer a summary of the license requirements, such as what level license is needed, exam required, power restrictions, etc.

(1) License: Technician Class. Cost is free, good for 10 years. Can be renewed.

(2) Exam: No-Code exam. Administered in nearly all communities by the local ham clubs. Cost to take test is under $15.

(3) Power Restrictions: Generally speaking, under 1500 watts PEP.

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I can't stop thinking about this licensing thing.

I just spent a few minutes purusing the X10.com site.....arguably the largest retailer of home security systems in this country, and the most frequently used cameras for projects on "our" site, yet NOWHERE on that site (X10) is there any mention that a license is required to operate their cameras! Even a quick scan of a few hundred messages on their forum.....nothing about licensing.

How can this be?

The FCC MUST be looking the other way on this issue. Otherwise they would require retailers to ask their customers to show proof of a valid HAM license before they can buy these products......yes?

If an amateur radio operator's license is required to operate a "nanny cam", then it begs the question "How many nannys are doing time for child battery based on evidence that was gathered illegally?"

I'm missing something here.....I think.

Tom Killoren

Holliston, MA

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http://www.rc-cam.com/faq.htm#fcc

The XCam is FCC approved for license free use. It is a registered Part 15 device. You can verify this by observing that it has the FCC ID number on the Tx's serial number label. Wireless video transmitters that do not have a valid FCC ID number printed on them are not license-free.

There are several FCC approved wireless video cameras out there. They are all low power (under 1 mW) and operate on 900Mhz (older designs) or 2.4Ghz. None are 1.2Ghz. However, in nearly every case, the video Tx's we are using are not license free (either because they are not Part 15 approved or they have been modified for more reliable range).

BTW, it would be a challenge to find a cheap license-free video Tx on eBay. Most are not even legal for hams to use due to their operating freq.

The FCC MUST be looking the other way on this issue.

They do not have the budget or staff to act as policeman. They have always relied on their interference complaint method. Even then, they are slow to respond and may not act unless the complaints are significant.

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