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Just a quick question...Why 5 miles?

To obtain such a distance you will need a transmitter that puts out Watts rather than MW's. The TX will be fairly large and a very good quality battery will also be needed to power it. This makes this setup only practical for larger models (80" upwards) because of the weight and size.

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If you're going to be flying 5 miles away, you'll need more than a standard r/c transmitter and receiver as well, they are usually rated around 1 or 2 miles at the most.

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thunder2005

I have done over 15 miles with a one watt 2.4 GHz transmitter on the aircraft.

and a 6 ft parabolic dish on the receiver.

I believe it was in September of 2003 Matt klarich and I conducted tests with a one watt video transmitter in a full scale Grumman aircraft and an Ultra light using the same 6 ft parabolic dish on the receiver and a 15 dbi Omni-Directional antenna. If I remember correctly the Omni-Directional antenna worked as good as the parabolic dish did out to about 15 miles.

With the 6 ft dish we could receive the transmitter out to about 25 miles.

But the aircraft was at 3500 ft AGL.

Matt if you see this and find that my feeble memory has it wrong please correct it.

Thanks.

Dave Jones.

AUAV.net

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I'm already flying a UAV call Silver Fox at work and I'm working on converting my RC plane to a UAV I got everything working with just over 1hrs flight time using GPS route upload before the flight in the GPS but would like to be capable to see the video feed back to me. Ok may be 5 miles is to much or will be to expensive for the TX/RX so something good for 3 - 5 milles range...

Any Suggestion for RX/TX for video...

Steeve

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Dave you are correct. The transmitter was a 50mw transmitter amplified to 1 watt, transmitter was using the standard POS 2db rubber duck.

Matt

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It pretty much comes down to how you want to receive it. If you are going to use a dish and point it or use an auto tracking system then you dont need much power. If you use a patch aerial then you need a bit more power but it is less fussy on aim and if you use standard dipole type aerial then you need even more power but dont need to aim the aerial at all. The only other choice is to use a colinear type used for networks that has good gain and dose not need aiming, the only down side is that it is poor if you fly too high and close.

Terry

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