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5V Buck Regulator Suggestion

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A few months ago I stumbled upon this great site looking at the page about voltage regulators. The 5V buck regulator was perfect for my application. Which is...powering a Motorola GPS engine (and max232) in an automotive application. I needed the efficiency of the buck regulator because the GPS is on 24/7. Unfortunately, the other day I let the magic smoke out of the one I had. No problem, I'll go to All-Electronics and rectify my mistake with a $10 expense. And they're sold out.

Does anyone have a suggestion for a low cost 5V DC-DC regulator that can accept 10-15V input? I need less than half an amp output (much less) current.

Thanks for your time. Browsing through this site reminds me of my RC days. :)

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Mr RC-Cam,

I need a little technical advice. I just bought a couple of 3.3 volt switching regulators from Dimension Engineering. (Thanks for the tip BTW) They are in the TO220 form factor. It didn't have any app notes with the order. Do I need to use the caps on input and output usually used with fixed regulators to prevent oscillation or is it OK as is?

edited with the following

I'm sorry. Never mind. I just went back to there web site and saw I don't need them.

Thanks

Dan

Edited by kd7ost

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It has 70mV of ripple. I would suggest you implement the 470uF low ESR cap, as shown in the app notes. And frankly, another low ESR .1uF ceramic on the input and output might be wise too. Everything must have short leads.

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What would serve as low ESR caps? Can I use a 470uf electrolitic on the output and a .1uf tantalum, or mylar or ceramic etc. on the input?

Thanks again

Dan

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Basically, the caps should be rated as "low ESR" types. Although you could spend hours comparing data sheets, it is much easier to just review the descriptions on places like digikey.com.

For sure, the ESR rating on caps is all over the map. Standard electrolytics are terrible, so look for those that are designed for switching supply applications (they will be advertised as low ESR).

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