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I held off so guess what I will order tomorrow! sorry guy's. Now I wonder if I should hold off on the altitude hold device or order it at the same time? hmmm.

PS. Cyberflyer, did you ever post about what was involved in adjusting the gains on the unav devices to get everything working properly. I think Bill has a RTH setup so maybe he could shed some light?

I would love to see this info posted to the new forum. Details would include the radio setup to trigger failsafe and turn the units on, intial installation and gain adjustments, test flights and readjustments, what was tested first. Basically a complete how to guide.

Anyone want to take a stab and help shorten the trail and error stage?

William

Edited by teleheli

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Me! Me! :)

I started by installing the co-pilot per the instructions and getting a feel for how it leveled the plane. I used the variable gain method so I could increase or decrease the copilot control while the plane was in the air. The goal was to be able to steer the plane via rudder only, while the copilot worked to keep the plane level using the ailerons and elevator.

Then I installed the PDC10 (which controls the rudder) and set the gain fairly low to start. After much trial and error, I eventually ended up with a fairly aggressive copilot setting, and almost full gain on the PDC10. Sometimes if there is a bit of wind the copilot causes the plane to buck as it forces it back to level (the twinstar is relatively light) but it always smooths out.

I still haven't programmed any failsafe in.

Regards,

Bill

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Does that mean you haven't programmed any waypoints? I have been using the Futaba PA1 (has 2 aileron servo inputs, The PA2 has only one) but haven't hooked up the PDC10. When I first started flying with PA1, I had the servos reversed in the unit-Talk about a squirrly flyer!. UNAV emailed me back today on how to wire up the PDC10 with my VDO. When you fly w.p.'s, tell us the final settings-guess no two planes will be the same though!

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I programmed a single waypoint, which is perhaps the most challenging test of the pdc10, because immediately after passing through the waypoint the plane does a sharp turn to go back through the waypoint again.

As you mention every plane is going to be different, but as long as you have a good understand of how the two pieces of equipment work, you should be able to get the plane dialed in pretty quick.

Good luck, and do take pictures before the maiden flight ;)

Bill

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BTW, all you guys who are going to rush out and buy the new, reduced price PDC10, please note, it appears from the UNAV picture, you do not get the beautiful $100 case! Ha, ha!

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As you mention every plane is going to be different, but as long as you have a good understand of how the two pieces of equipment work, you should be able to get the plane dialed in pretty quick.

One thing to add to Bill's comments is that co-pilot's control gain can change depending on the weather conditions (and altitude ;) ). Higher co-pilot's gain usually require higher rudder deflection for the same rate of turn. To have constant rate of turn the co-pilot's gain and PDC10's gain have to balanced through trial and error. If they are not, the plane will either turn too slow (increase PDC-10 gain or decrease co-pilot's gain to fix it) or too fast. The problem with co-pilot is that its gain will fluctuate and the difference can be significant enough to force a model into spiral dive if PDC10 gain is too aggressive. This usually does not happen but it is good to keep this possibility in mind.

Regards,

Val.

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Val, that is a good point. I haven't flown the copilot over a very broad range of weather conditions and so I think I've been fortunate that my results have stayed relatively consistent. I also limit my altitude changes to under 1000 feet ;)

Do you fly with the copilot on a variable channel so you can adjust it while the plane is in the air?

Regards,

Bill

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Do you fly with the copilot on a variable channel

I do but I rarely adjust it in the air as it usually behaves well with initial preflight calibration.

Val.

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